When you bring to mind someone “hacking” a computer one of the images that likely comes up is a screen of complex code designed to crack through your security technology.  Whereas there is a technological element to every security incident, the issue usually starts with a simple mistake made by one person.   Hackers understand that it is far easier to trick a person into providing a password, executing malicious software, or entering information into a fake website, than cracking an encrypted network — and hackers prey on the fact that you think “nobody is targeting me.”

Below are some guidelines to help keep you and your technology safe on the network.

General Best Practices

Let’s start with some general guidelines on things you should never do with regards to your computer or your online accounts.

First, never share your personal information with any individual or website unless you are certain you know with whom you are dealing.  Hackers often will call their target (you) pretending to be a service desk technician or someone you would trust.  The hacker than asks you to provide personal information such as passwords, login ids, computer names, etc.; which all can be used to compromise your accounts.  The best thing to do in this case, unless you are expecting someone from your IT department to call you, is to politely end the conversation and call the service desk back on a number provided to you by your company.  Note, this type of attack also applies to websites. Technology exists for hackers to quickly set up “spoofed” websites, or websites designed to look and act the same as legitimate sites with which you are familiar.  In effect this is the same approach as pretending to be a legitimate IT employee; however, here the hacker entices you to enter information (username and password) into a bogus site in an attempt to steal the information.  Be wary of links to sites that are sent to you through untrusted sources or email.  If you encounter a site that doesn’t quite look right or isn’t responding the way you expect it to, don’t use the site.  Try to access the site through a familiar link. Continue Reading Cybersecurity Best Practices

Cross-posted from Carpe Datum Law

On May 25, 2018, the EU General Data Protection Regulation (“GDPR”) will impose significant new obligations on all U.S. companies that handle personal data of any EU individual. U.S. companies can be fined up to €20 million or 4% of their global annual revenue for the most egregious violations. What does the future passage of GDPR mean for your business?

Our experienced eDiscovery and Information Governance (eDIG) and Global Privacy and Security (GPS) practitioners will present a series of four 1-hour webinars in August through October of 2017. The presenters will provide a high-level discussion on risk assessment tools and remediation strategies to help prepare and reduce the cost of EU GDPR compliance. Continue Reading Is your organization ready for the new EU General Data Protection Regulation?

The 2017 edition of The Legal 500 United States recommends Seyfarth Shaw’s Global Privacy & Security Team as one of the best in the country for Cyber Law (including data protection and privacy). In addition, based on feedback from corporate counsel, the co-chairs of Seyfarth’s group, Scott A. Carlson and John P. Tomaszewski, and Seyfarth partners Karla Grossenbacher (head of Seyfarth’s National Workplace Privacy Team) and Richard D. Lutkus were recommended in the editorial. Richard Lutkus is also listed as one of 14 “Next Generation Lawyers.”

The Legal 500 United States is an independent guide providing comprehensive coverage on legal services and is widely referenced for its definitive judgment of law firm capabilities.