Today, the Court of Justice of the EU has handed down its judgment in the highly-anticipated Facebook Ireland case (aka Schrems II) and invalidated the Privacy Shield Decision. For those of you who have followed this case, the CJEU took a “left turn at Albuquerque” in its decision since the primary contention of Mr. Schrems was that the Commission Decision around Standard Contractual Clauses (“SCCs”) was invalid.

While the Court did opine on the SCC issue, it didn’t stop there. The Court actually took up a broader scope and addressed the validity of the Privacy Shield decision. In a mentally acrobatic exercise, we ended up with a judgment that preserved the SCCs decision (kind of), but invalidated the Privacy Shield Decision – even after there had been multiple renewals of the adequacy finding of Privacy Shield in the past. Additionally, along with the logical gymnastics around Privacy Shield, the SCCs aren’t quite out of the woods yet.
Continue Reading CJEU Invalidates EU-US Privacy Shield Framework

While a lot of ink has been spilled on the California Consumer Privacy Act (“CCPA”) over the last 18 months, one of the things which has become quite apparent to those of us who view privacy through a lens which considers both EU and US perspectives is that the CCPA is actually not an EU-style law. Except for the right to delete data, all the consumer rights in the CCPA actually existed (albeit in a much less aggressive form) for many categories of information under prior California law. When one considers the number of carve-outs to the deletion right, the CCPA actually looks a lot like what is the more traditional approach to privacy that is prevalent under US jurisprudence.
Continue Reading Europe’s Privacy Law is Coming – Just Not Via California

On Thursday, July 11, 2019, a diverse group of trade associations spanning numerous industries, including retail, telecom, manufacturing, and food and beverage, urged Congress to enact a consumer privacy law.  In a letter to the Senate and House commerce committees, the coalition of 27 industry groups asked Congress “to act quickly to adopt a robust

Seyfarth Shaw Offers Data Privacy & Protection in the EU-U.S. Desktop Guide and On-Demand Webinar Series

On May 25, 2018, the EU General Data Protection Regulation (“GDPR”) will impose significant new obligations on all U.S. companies that handle personal data of any EU individual. U.S. companies can be fined up to €20 million or 4%

Cross-posted from Carpe Datum Law

On May 25, 2018, the EU General Data Protection Regulation (“GDPR”) will impose significant new obligations on all U.S. companies that handle personal data of any EU individual. U.S. companies can be fined up to €20 million or 4% of their global annual revenue for the most egregious violations. What does the future passage of GDPR mean for your business?

Our experienced eDiscovery and Information Governance (eDIG) and Global Privacy and Security (GPS) practitioners will present a series of four 1-hour webinars in August through October of 2017. The presenters will provide a high-level discussion on risk assessment tools and remediation strategies to help prepare and reduce the cost of EU GDPR compliance.
Continue Reading Is your organization ready for the new EU General Data Protection Regulation?

The General Data Protection Regulation is coming, and along with it, a significant expectation of increased harmonization in the privacy rules across the EU. Considering the 60-plus articles which directly impose obligations on controllers and processors, this isn’t an unreasonable sentiment. However (as is often the case with the EU), reality is a bit more

Sedona-Conference-Header


When:           Monday, April 24, 2017
Where:          Offices of Seyfarth Shaw LLP, Chicago, IL
Sign in:          5:00 – 5:30 pm
Event:            5:30 – 6:30 pm
Reception:    6:30 – 7:30 pm

Topic: Interactive Dialogue concerning The Sedona Conference® International Litigation Principles (Transitional Edition): Practical Help for Companies with the EU General Data Protection Regulation and Privacy Shield

shutterstock_172034426Cross-posted from Carpe Datum Law.

Beginning on April 12, 2017, U.S. organizations that are subject to the investigatory and enforcement powers of the FTC or the Department of Transportation will be able to self-certify to the newly adopted Swiss–U.S. Privacy Shield Framework (“Swiss Privacy Shield”). The Swiss Privacy Shield will allow transfers of Swiss personal data to the United States in compliance with Swiss data protection requirements. The Swiss Privacy Shield will replace the U.S.–Swiss Safe Harbor Framework and will impose similar data protection requirements established last summer for cross-border transfers of personal data from the EU under the EU–U.S. Privacy Shield (“Privacy Shield”).

With the adoption of the Swiss Privacy Shield, transfers of personal data from Switzerland under the Swiss Safe Harbor Framework will no longer be permitted. Organizations currently registered with the Swiss Safe Harbor would need to certify under the Swiss Privacy Shield or implement alternative methods for complying with Swiss data transfer restrictions, such as Standard Contractual Clauses and Binding Corporate Rules. To join the Swiss Safe Harbor, organizations would need to ensure that their privacy policies, notices, statements, and procedures are in compliance with the new framework. The Department of Commerce provides sample language that can be used in an organization’s privacy policy to signify its participation in the Swiss Privacy Shield.

Organizations with active Privacy Shield certifications will be able to add the Swiss Privacy Shield registration to their existing Privacy Shield accounts, at a separate annual fee. Similarly to the Privacy Shield, the fee for participation in the Swiss Privacy Shield will be tiered based on the organization’s annual revenue. The exact fee structure will be made available sometime before April 12.

Notably, organizations with dual registrations, would need to recertify under both the Privacy Shield and the Swiss Privacy Shield one year from the date the first of their two certifications was finalized. That means, for instance, that an organization that registered for the Privacy Shield on September 1, 2016, which then registers for the Swiss Privacy Shield on May 1, 2017, would need to complete its annual recertification under both frameworks by September 1, 2017.

While the requirements of the two frameworks are nearly identical, there are a few differences:
Continue Reading The Swiss Privacy Shield Opens for Business on April 12

shutterstock_519689296Seyfarth Shaw is pleased to announce the launch of Carpe Datum Law, a one-stop resource for legal professionals seeking to stay abreast of fast-paced developments in eDiscovery and information governance, including data privacy, data security, and records and information management. Seyfarth’s eDiscovery and Information Governance (eDIG) practice group created Carpe Datum Law to serve