California, home to more than 40 million people and the 5th largest economy in the world, has passed the California Consumer Privacy Act (CCPA), its omnibus consumer privacy law. The law creates sweeping new requirements concerning the collection, maintenance, and tracking of information for both employees or customers who are residents of California. Many aspects of the implementation and enforcement are still being finalized by the California Attorney General. However, companies with employees or customers in California need to take stock of the information they are processing that could qualify as “personal information” for California residents, and they need to begin establishing mechanisms for compliance before the end of 2019.
Continue Reading

Welcome to the California Consumer Privacy Act (CCPA) […as if we didn’t have enough to worry about with the GDPR!].

The bracketed, italicized text, albeit a bit cynical, is with little doubt, how many of us initially reacted to the news of a new data protection law, hailed as the standard in consumer privacy protection, in California. And while the effective date is supposed to be January of 2020, January of 2019 isn’t too early to starting getting ready for the new law.

To dispel the rumors, the CCPA is not “GDPR-lite.” Where it comes on the heels of the GDPR’s May 2018 enforcement date, it isn’t a mirror image of the GDPR, or even a “watered down” variant of it. Drafters of the CCPA did indeed look to the GDPR as a basis for some of data protection concepts, but they focused on existing California privacy laws as well.


Continue Reading

In September of this year, with SB 327, California stepped into the vanguard of information age law by passing a cybersecurity regulation on the Internet of Things. SB 327 has added new sections to Cal. Civil Code §1798. Specifically, §1798.91 et seq. While this seems to be a good thing, the larger question is what does it do, and how far does it reach?

Continue Reading

At the end of June, the California legislature passed its Bill 375, the California Consumer Privacy Act of 2018.  The Act contains a number of concepts that would be familiar to those who are working to bring their companies and organizations into compliance with GDPR.  The new law defines a category of “Personal Information” that 

Seyfarth Shaw Offers Data Privacy & Protection in the EU-U.S. Desktop Guide and On-Demand Webinar Series

On May 25, 2018, the EU General Data Protection Regulation (“GDPR”) will impose significant new obligations on all U.S. companies that handle personal data of any EU individual. U.S. companies can be fined up to €20 million or 4%

Cross-posted from Employment Law Lookout.

Seyfarth Synopsis:  A string of recent class action lawsuits regarding businesses’ use of employees’ biometric data should put employers on heightened alert regarding compliance with various state biometric privacy laws.

As biometric technology has become more advanced and affordable, more employers have begun implementing procedures and systems that rely on employees’ biometric data. “Biometrics” are measurements of individual biological patterns or characteristics such as fingerprints, voiceprints, and eye scans that can be used to quickly and easily identify employees.  However, unlike social security numbers or other personal identifiers, biometrics are biologically unique and, generally speaking, immutable.  Thus, unlike a bank account or a social security number, which can be changed if it is stolen, biometric data, when compromised, cannot be changed or replaced, leaving an affected individual without recourse and at a heightened risk for identity theft.  Given the serious repercussions of compromised biometric data, a number of states have proposed or passed laws regulating the collection and storage of biometric data.  And plaintiffs’ attorneys are taking notice, as the number of class action lawsuits in this area has surged in recent months.

Currently, there are three states that have statutes regulating the collection and storage of biometric data: Illinois, Texas, and Washington.  In 2008, Illinois passed the Biometric Information Privacy Act (“BIPA”).  Texas followed suit in 2009, and Washington passed its biometric privacy law in 2017.
Continue Reading

Cross-posted from Carpe Datum Law

On May 25, 2018, the EU General Data Protection Regulation (“GDPR”) will impose significant new obligations on all U.S. companies that handle personal data of any EU individual. U.S. companies can be fined up to €20 million or 4% of their global annual revenue for the most egregious violations. What does the future passage of GDPR mean for your business?

Our experienced eDiscovery and Information Governance (eDIG) and Global Privacy and Security (GPS) practitioners will present a series of four 1-hour webinars in August through October of 2017. The presenters will provide a high-level discussion on risk assessment tools and remediation strategies to help prepare and reduce the cost of EU GDPR compliance.
Continue Reading

The General Data Protection Regulation is coming, and along with it, a significant expectation of increased harmonization in the privacy rules across the EU. Considering the 60-plus articles which directly impose obligations on controllers and processors, this isn’t an unreasonable sentiment. However (as is often the case with the EU), reality is a bit more

shutterstock_172034426Cross-posted from Carpe Datum Law.

Beginning on April 12, 2017, U.S. organizations that are subject to the investigatory and enforcement powers of the FTC or the Department of Transportation will be able to self-certify to the newly adopted Swiss–U.S. Privacy Shield Framework (“Swiss Privacy Shield”). The Swiss Privacy Shield will allow transfers of Swiss personal data to the United States in compliance with Swiss data protection requirements. The Swiss Privacy Shield will replace the U.S.–Swiss Safe Harbor Framework and will impose similar data protection requirements established last summer for cross-border transfers of personal data from the EU under the EU–U.S. Privacy Shield (“Privacy Shield”).

With the adoption of the Swiss Privacy Shield, transfers of personal data from Switzerland under the Swiss Safe Harbor Framework will no longer be permitted. Organizations currently registered with the Swiss Safe Harbor would need to certify under the Swiss Privacy Shield or implement alternative methods for complying with Swiss data transfer restrictions, such as Standard Contractual Clauses and Binding Corporate Rules. To join the Swiss Safe Harbor, organizations would need to ensure that their privacy policies, notices, statements, and procedures are in compliance with the new framework. The Department of Commerce provides sample language that can be used in an organization’s privacy policy to signify its participation in the Swiss Privacy Shield.

Organizations with active Privacy Shield certifications will be able to add the Swiss Privacy Shield registration to their existing Privacy Shield accounts, at a separate annual fee. Similarly to the Privacy Shield, the fee for participation in the Swiss Privacy Shield will be tiered based on the organization’s annual revenue. The exact fee structure will be made available sometime before April 12.

Notably, organizations with dual registrations, would need to recertify under both the Privacy Shield and the Swiss Privacy Shield one year from the date the first of their two certifications was finalized. That means, for instance, that an organization that registered for the Privacy Shield on September 1, 2016, which then registers for the Swiss Privacy Shield on May 1, 2017, would need to complete its annual recertification under both frameworks by September 1, 2017.

While the requirements of the two frameworks are nearly identical, there are a few differences:
Continue Reading

Cross Posted from California Peculiarities Employment Law Blog

Hernandez v. Sprouts Farmers Market, Inc., a case stemming from a phishing scam, emphasizes the need for California employers to implement comprehensive data protection and data breach notification policies and practices for personal employee information under the CDPA.

A story of a company suffering a data breach tops newspaper headlines almost daily. So how can you stay out of the “fuego,” and stay compliant with California laws about your employees’ and customers’ data?

California’s Data Protection Act—“Army Of One”

In 2003 California passed the nation’s first data breach notification statute: the CDPA. Since then, over 30 states have enacted similar statutes, but California remains the national leader in privacy and data security standards.

The CDPA mandates that any business that “owns or licenses personal information about a California resident shall implement and maintain reasonable security procedures and practices appropriate to the nature of the information, to protect the personal information from unauthorized access, destruction, use, modification, or disclosure.” And it requires a company to notify affected individuals of a data breach “in the most expedient time possible and without unreasonable delay.”
Continue Reading