Seyfarth has released the results of its fourth annual Real Estate Market Sentiment Survey, which polled commercial real estate executives around the country from all sectors. Of interest to our readers, this year’s survey revealed that 69% of respondents are concerned about a cyberattack hitting their business in 2019, a significant increase compared to last year (46%).

View the full survey results

Cybersecurity isn’t just for technology companies anymore. More and more, we are seeing other critical infrastructure participants becoming targets of cybersecurity attacks. Transportation, construction, and other real property-heavy industries are starting to catch the eye of sophisticated hacking teams – both criminal as well as nation-state sponsored groups.

There are two different threat models in the real estate market: the builder and the manager.
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In September of this year, with SB 327, California stepped into the vanguard of information age law by passing a cybersecurity regulation on the Internet of Things. SB 327 has added new sections to Cal. Civil Code §1798. Specifically, §1798.91 et seq. While this seems to be a good thing, the larger question is what does it do, and how far does it reach?

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Seyfarth Shaw Offers Data Privacy & Protection in the EU-U.S. Desktop Guide and On-Demand Webinar Series

On May 25, 2018, the EU General Data Protection Regulation (“GDPR”) will impose significant new obligations on all U.S. companies that handle personal data of any EU individual. U.S. companies can be fined up to €20 million or 4%

When you bring to mind someone “hacking” a computer one of the images that likely comes up is a screen of complex code designed to crack through your security technology.  Whereas there is a technological element to every security incident, the issue usually starts with a simple mistake made by one person.   Hackers understand that it is far easier to trick a person into providing a password, executing malicious software, or entering information into a fake website, than cracking an encrypted network — and hackers prey on the fact that you think “nobody is targeting me.”

Below are some guidelines to help keep you and your technology safe on the network.

General Best Practices

Let’s start with some general guidelines on things you should never do with regards to your computer or your online accounts.

First, never share your personal information with any individual or website unless you are certain you know with whom you are dealing.  Hackers often will call their target (you) pretending to be a service desk technician or someone you would trust.  The hacker than asks you to provide personal information such as passwords, login ids, computer names, etc.; which all can be used to compromise your accounts.  The best thing to do in this case, unless you are expecting someone from your IT department to call you, is to politely end the conversation and call the service desk back on a number provided to you by your company.  Note, this type of attack also applies to websites. Technology exists for hackers to quickly set up “spoofed” websites, or websites designed to look and act the same as legitimate sites with which you are familiar.  In effect this is the same approach as pretending to be a legitimate IT employee; however, here the hacker entices you to enter information (username and password) into a bogus site in an attempt to steal the information.  Be wary of links to sites that are sent to you through untrusted sources or email.  If you encounter a site that doesn’t quite look right or isn’t responding the way you expect it to, don’t use the site.  Try to access the site through a familiar link.
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Cross-posted from Carpe Datum Law

On May 25, 2018, the EU General Data Protection Regulation (“GDPR”) will impose significant new obligations on all U.S. companies that handle personal data of any EU individual. U.S. companies can be fined up to €20 million or 4% of their global annual revenue for the most egregious violations. What does the future passage of GDPR mean for your business?

Our experienced eDiscovery and Information Governance (eDIG) and Global Privacy and Security (GPS) practitioners will present a series of four 1-hour webinars in August through October of 2017. The presenters will provide a high-level discussion on risk assessment tools and remediation strategies to help prepare and reduce the cost of EU GDPR compliance.
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Cross-posted from Carpe Datum Law

Recently, a widespread global ransomware attack has struck hospitals, communication, and other types of companies and government offices around the world, seizing control of affected computers until the victims pay a ransom.  This widespread ransomware campaign has affected various organizations with reports of tens of thousands of infections in

shutterstock_196544378Cross Posted from Carpe Datum Law.

China has finalized a broad new Cyber Security Law, its first comprehensive data privacy and security regulation.  It addresses specific privacy rights previously adopted in the European Union and elsewhere such as access, data retention, breach notification, mobile privacy, online fraud and protection of minors.

There is plenty in the new law to irritate international businesses operating in China.  It requires in general that Chinese citizens’ data be stored only in China, for starters, possibly requiring global corporations to maintain separate IT systems for Chinese data.  Most of the privacy enhancements benefiting citizens align with those required in the European Union, but it is unclear how the Chinese will expect compliance, particularly since, as with many Chinese laws, its language is vague as to its scope, application and details.  This vagueness leaves interpretation to the State Council, the chief administrative authority in China, headed by Premier Li Keqiang.

The law expands Chinese authorities’ power to investigate even within a corporation’s Chinese data systems, and provides for draconian penalties for non-compliance by business entities or responsible individuals  include warnings, rectification orders, fines, confiscation of illegal gains, suspension of business operations or the revocation of the entity’s business license.
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CaptureDo you and your firm have adequate cybersecurity to prevent yourself (and your confidential client data) from getting hacked?

On Wednesday, December 7, at 11:00 a.m. Pacific, Richard Lutkus, a partner in Seyfarth Shaw’s eDiscovery and Information Governance Practice; and Joseph Martinez, Chief Technology Officer and Vice President of Forensics, eDiscovery & Information Security

Over the past few years, users have become increasingly aware of the inherent dangers of connecting to unsecured Wi-Fi networks. Unfortunately, existing security vulnerabilities in the underlying network hardware may still open a user’s computer to security issues.

Recently, Wired reported that security firm Cylance discovered a vulnerability in a specific brand of network routers deployed throughout many hotel chains throughout the world that could allow someone to install malware on guest’ computers, analyze and record data transferred over the network, and possibly access the hotel’s reservation and keycard systems. Researchers were able to locate 277 vulnerable routers in 29 different countries across and over 100 of them were located within the United States.
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Much has been written about Heartbleed and the significant impact it has on the security infrastructure of the internet. Articles and blog postings have taken both the “sky is falling” and “it’s not so bad” points of view. However, there is a more fundamental issue which has raised its ugly head – is the use of open source “commercially reasonable” in a security framework?
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