At the end of June, the California legislature passed its Bill 375, the California Consumer Privacy Act of 2018.  The Act contains a number of concepts that would be familiar to those who are working to bring their companies and organizations into compliance with GDPR.  The new law defines a category of “Personal Information” that radically departs from a traditional definition of Personal Data commonly found in various State Data Privacy Laws, which usually ties an individual name to other identifiers like social security number, account number, or other factors.  Instead, the California Act defines “Personal Information” as information that identifies, relates to, describes, is capable of being associated with, or could reasonably be linked, directly or indirectly, with a particular consumer or household.  It does not, mercifully, include publicly available information, but it still comes closer to a GDPR-like definition of “personal data” than any other US law.

The Act provides California residents some rights that also appear familiar.  For example:

  • Consumers can request a copy of all the Personal Information a business has collected;
  • Consumers have the right to request that the business delete their Personal Information (subject to some exceptions), and a right to direct a company to not share their Personal Information with third parties; and
  • Consumers can request that a business disclose the categories of information it has collected, the sources of information, the purpose for the collection and/or its sale of the information, and the third parties with whom the information is shared.

These certainly sound like concepts that could be referenced as The Right to Access; The Right to Be Forgotten; and Data Portability.

Business requirements include:

  • Meaningful notifications to consumers at the point of contact where Personal Information is collected;
  • Updated online privacy notices to include the types of Personal Information collected, the purpose of collection, and rights information;
  • Implementation of Data Security measures to protect Personal Information;
  • Providing training to employees handling Personal Information or involved in consumer inquiries;
  • The inclusion of provisions in contracts with third parties with whom Personal Information is shared to include data privacy protections and restrictions on disclosure; and
  • The inclusion of a “do not sell my personal information” option on public facing interfaces and websites that collect personal information. Companies must take measures to not discriminate against users who opt out, but at the same time they can offer price incentives to those who chose to opt in.

The Act takes effect on January 1, 2020.  It has the same approximate 2 year “runway” period that GDPR provided in 2016 (leading up to May 25, 2018) for companies to gear up their compliance.  This law has potentially widespread impact, but some of the mechanisms of its application remain unclear, due in some degree to some of its broadly worded language.  In this way, it is also similar to the GDPR.

The challenge with implementation for large companies is the same as every other State level data privacy law – it is often virtually impossible to reliably identify who the “California” consumers are.  Thereby making it by practical necessity a global requirement for all publicly facing systems and applications for all users.

We recommend that most companies prioritize and stage their compliance today, focusing on GDPR in the short term, but  a California (or potentially necessary practical nationwide) compliance strategy should be included in late 2018 and 2019 IT and Privacy compliance plans.

Seyfarth Shaw Offers Data Privacy & Protection in the EU-U.S. Desktop Guide and On-Demand Webinar Series

On May 25, 2018, the EU General Data Protection Regulation (“GDPR”) will impose significant new obligations on all U.S. companies that handle personal data of any EU individual. U.S. companies can be fined up to €20 million or 4% of their global annual revenue for the most egregious violations. What does the future passage of GDPR mean for your business?

Seyfarth’s eDiscovery and Information Governance (eDIG) and Global Privacy and Security (GPS) practitioners are pleased to announce the release of Data Privacy & Protection in the EU-U.S.: What Companies Need to Know Now, which describes GDPR’s unique legal structure and remedies, and includes tips and strategies in light of the future passage of the GDPR.

How to Get Your Desktop Guide:

To request the Data Privacy & Protection in the EU-U.S. Desktop Guide as a pdf or hard copy, please click the button below:

GDPR Webinar Series

Throughout August and October of 2017, Seyfarth Shaw’s attorneys provided high-level discussions on risk assessment tools and remediation strategies to help companies prepare and reduce the cost of EU GDPR compliance. Each segment is one hour long and can be accessed on-demand at Seyfarth’s Carpe Datum Law Blog and The Global Privacy Watch Blog.

For updates and insight on GDPR, we invite you to click here to subscribe to Seyfarth’s Carpe Datum Law Blog and here to subscribe to Seyfarth’s The Global Privacy Watch Blog.

Cross-posted from Carpe Datum Law

On May 25, 2018, the EU General Data Protection Regulation (“GDPR”) will impose significant new obligations on all U.S. companies that handle personal data of any EU individual. U.S. companies can be fined up to €20 million or 4% of their global annual revenue for the most egregious violations. What does the future passage of GDPR mean for your business?

Our experienced eDiscovery and Information Governance (eDIG) and Global Privacy and Security (GPS) practitioners will present a series of four 1-hour webinars in August through October of 2017. The presenters will provide a high-level discussion on risk assessment tools and remediation strategies to help prepare and reduce the cost of EU GDPR compliance. Continue Reading Is your organization ready for the new EU General Data Protection Regulation?

shutterstock_519689296Seyfarth Shaw is pleased to announce the launch of Carpe Datum Law, a one-stop resource for legal professionals seeking to stay abreast of fast-paced developments in eDiscovery and information governance, including data privacy, data security, and records and information management. Seyfarth’s eDiscovery and Information Governance (eDIG) practice group created Carpe Datum Law to serve as a timely and unique resource for executives and corporate in-house counsel to obtain reports on developments, trends and game-changing decisions in these data-driven areas of the law.

Click here to access the new Carpe Datum Law blogsite.

The Carpe Datum Law blog takes a comprehensive view of the legal and practical aspects of corporate data challenges, reflecting the broad strength across the spectrum of data law by Seyfarth’s veteran 14-lawyer eDIG practice group, which has served clients since 2004. Regular readers will benefit from its comprehensive perspective and guidance on how the law is adapting to the interrelated challenges of keeping corporate data secure and in compliance with data privacy laws, adapting to new best practices in information governance, and maintaining defensible data preservation, collection and review when eDiscovery is required.

Carpe Datum Law is a must-read for anyone expected to stay ahead of the curve on how best to manage the growing risks in these areas, in particular:

  • C-Level Executives whose portfolios of responsibility include managing risks with respect to their corporate data
  • In-House Counsel responsible for eDiscovery, data and cybersecurity, data privacy compliance and/or the enterprise’s information governance
  • eDiscovery, IT, IT Security and Privacy Managers who work closely on these issues with their organization’s executives and legal teams
  • Consultants, Academics and Thought Leaders who must stay up-to-speed on legal developments in order to serve their organizational clients

Whether steering policy or implementing it, Carpe Datum Law provides well-informed news and analysis that will keep you and your team up-to-speed. From judicial decisions implementing the new eDiscovery amendments to the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure to guidance on compliance with the upcoming European Union General Data Protection Regulation, Carpe Datum Law provides the news and seasoned analysis you would expect from Seyfarth’s eDIG group.

Carpe Datum Law can be accessed at www.carpedatumlaw.com.

CaptureOn Wednesday, November 2, at 1:00 p.m. Central, Seyfarth attorneys Karla Grossenbacher, Ari Hersher, Stacey Blecher, Meredith-Anne Berger, Elizabeth Levy and Selyn Hon will present “Navigating Employee Privacy Issues in the Workplace.”

The rise of technology in the workplace has resulted in a myriad of complex privacy issues. Employee privacy concerns are impacting employer decision-making more than ever. Is your company equipped to navigate these issues? In this cutting-edge webinar we will discuss:

  • The legal issues presented by an employer’s review of employee texts, emails and social media postings during workplace investigations;
  • The latest decisions from the NLRB regarding an employer’s ability to take action against employees based on social media postings;
  • Privacy considerations presented by the implementation of a BYOD policy; and
  • Private data security risks that arise from the use of cloud-based storage in the workplace

Please join us for this informative webinar so you will be prepared to confront the ever-increasing amount of privacy issues facing employers.

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